The Art of Doing Nothing

The Art of Doing Nothing

The Art of Doing Nothing

Guest post by: Leo Babauta

Sure, we all know how to do nothing. We all know how to lay around and waste time. But many of us are too busy to do it much, and when we do it, our minds are often on other things. We cannot relax and enjoy the nothingness.

Doing nothing can be a waste of time, or it can be an art form. Here’s how to become a master, and in the process, improve your life, melt away the stress and make yourself more productive when you actually do work.

Start small
Doing nothing, in the true sense of the word, can be overwhelming if you attempt to do too much nothing at once. Do small nothings at first. Focus on 5-10 minutes at a time, and start your practice sessions in a safe place — at home, not at work or in a busy public place. You may also not be ready to do nothing in the middle of nature, so do it in your bedroom or living room. Find a time and place where there are not many distractions, not much noise, not a lot of people to bother you.

Shut off all distractions — TV, computer, cell phones, regular phones, Blackberries, and the like. Doing nothing is hard when our communications gadgets are calling at us to do something.

Now, close your eyes, and do nothing. Yes, the smart-asses out there will say you’re doing something — you’re sitting there or laying there, closing your eyes. But we mean doing nothing in the sense that if someone were to call us up and ask what we’re doing, we say “Oh, nothing.” Don’t let them call you up, though. They are trying to distract you.

After 5-10 minutes of doing, nothing, you can quit, and go do something. But try to do this every day, or as much as possible, because it is not possible to become a master without practice.

Breathing
The first place to start in the quest for mastery over this art is in your breathing. If this sounds suspiciously like meditation, well, cast those suspicions out of your mind. We are not here to do suspicion — we are doing nothing.

Start first by breathing slowly in, and then slowly out. Now closely monitor your breath as it enters your body, through your nose, and goes down into your lungs, and fills your lungs. Now feel it as it goes out of your body, through your mouth, and feel the satisfying emptying of your lungs.

Do this for 5-10 minutes, if you can. Practice this as you can. When you start thinking about other things, such as how great that darn Zen Habits blog is, well, stop that! Don’t beat yourself up about it, but bring your thoughts back to your breathing every time.

Relaxing
An important part of doing nothing is being able to completely relax. If we are tense, then the doing of the nothing is really for naught. Relaxing starts by finding a comfortable place to do your nothing — a soft chair, a plush couch, a well-made, clean bed. Once you’ve found this spot, lie in it, and wiggle around to make it fit your body better. Think of how a cat lies down, and makes itself comfortable. Cats are very, very good at doing nothing. You may never approach their level of mastery, but they make for great inspiration.

Next, try the breathing technique. If you are not completely relaxed by now (and a short nap would be a great indication of relaxation), then try self massage. Yes, massage is much better when administered by other hands, but self massage is great too. Start with your shoulders and neck. Work your way up to your head and even your face. Also do your back, and legs and arms. Avoid any areas that might lead to doing something (although that can be relaxing too).

Yet another great way of relaxing is an exercise where you tense each muscle in your body, one body part at a time, and then let the tensed muscle relax. Start with your feet, then your legs, and work your way up to your eyebrows. If you can do the top of your head, you may be too advanced for this article.

Once you are relaxed, see if you can relax even more. Try not to relax so much that you lose control of your bodily fluids.

Bathing – an advanced stage
Those who are in the beginning stages of the Art of Doing Nothing should not attempt this stage. But once you’ve become proficient at the above steps, the stage of the Bath can be pretty great.

The bath must be nice and hot. Not lukewarm, but hot. Bubbles are also required, even if you are a man who is too manly for this. Just don’t tell any of your guy friends. Other bath accessories, such as a loofah sponge, or bath gels, or potpourri, are very optional (editor’s note: think hilarious Friends episode).

Again, you must have all distractions shut off. Bathing is also best done if you are alone in the house, but if not, everyone else in the house must know that you CANNOT be disturbed, even if the house is burning down. If they break this sacred rule, you must turn upon them with the Wrath of Hell(tm).

Step into your bath, one foot at a time, very slowly. If your bath is properly hot, it is best if you get into it an inch at a time. For more sensitive body parts, such as the crotchal area, it is best to squeeze your eyes shut tight and slowly lower yourself into the steaming water despite all instincts to flee. Once you are fully immersed (and you should go completely under, head included, at first), close your eyes, and feel the heat penetrating your body.

You may begin to sweat. This is a good thing. Allow the sweat to flow. You may need a glass of water as the sweat could dehydrate you. A good book is another great way to enjoy your bath. Allow your muscles to be penetrated by the heat, to be relaxed completely, and feel all your worries and stresses and aches and inner turmoil flow out of your body into the water.

A hot bath is even more awesome if followed by a bracing cold shower. Either way, get out of the bath once the water is no longer warm and your skin is very raisin-like.

Tasting and feeling
Doing nothing is also great when accompanied by very good beverages or food. Good tea or coffee, wine, hot cocoa, and other sensual beverages go very well with the Art. It’s best to take these beverages by themselves, with no food, and without a book or other distractions. Focus on the liquid as you sip it slowly, savoring every bit of the flavor and texture and temperature in your mouth before swallowing, and feeling the swallow completely. Close your eyes as you do this. Truly enjoy this drink.

Foods are also great: berries, rich desserts, freshly made bread, the best … soup … ever, or whatever it is that you love. Be sure you eat it slowly, savoring every bite. Chew slowly, and close your eyes as you enjoy the food. Feel the texture in your mouth. It is bliss!

Doing nothing in nature

Once you’ve passed the above stages, it is time to practice this gentle art out in nature. Find a peaceful place — in your front yard if that’s peaceful, a park, the woods, at the beach, a river, a lake — places with water are excellent. Places out of reach of the sounds of traffic and city life are best.

Out here in nature, you can practice the art for 20 minutes, an hour, or even longer. There are fewer distractions, and you can really shut yourself off from the stresses of life. Don’t just let your mind wander everywhere — focus on the natural surroundings around you. Look closely at the plants, at the water, at the wildlife. Truly appreciate the majesty of nature, the miracle of life.

Incorporating the Art in daily life
This is the final stage of mastering this Art. Don’t attempt it until you’ve practiced and become competent at the above stages.

Start by doing nothing while you are waiting in line, at the doctor’s office, on a bus, or for a plane. Wait, without reading a newspaper or magazine, without talking on the phone, without checking your email, without writing out your to-do list, without doing any work, without worrying about what you need to do later. Wait, and do nothing. Concentrate on your breathing, or try one of the relaxation techniques above. Concentrate on those around you — watch them, try to understand them, listen to their conversations.

Next, try doing nothing when you drive. Yes, you must drive, but try to do nothing else. Don’t listen to music or news or an audiotape. Don’t multi-task. Don’t talk on your cell phone, don’t eat, and don’t do your makeup. Just drive. Concentrate on your driving, look at the things you are passing, and feel your breathing. Relax yourself, and don’t worry about the other drivers (but don’t crash into them!). Drive slowly, going easy on the gas and brake pedals. This technique has a great side-effect: better gas mileage.

Last, try doing nothing in the middle of chaos, in your workplace or other stressful environment. Just shut everything out, close your eyes, and think about your breathing. Try a relaxation technique. Do this for 5-10 minutes at a time, building up to 20-30 minutes. If you can do this, in the middle of a stressful day at work or with the kids, you will allow yourself to focus more fully on the task at hand. You will be relaxed and ready to concentrate, to bring yourself into a state of flow. (Warning: Doing nothing could get you in trouble with your boss, so be careful! But if it makes you more productive, you boss might not mind.)

Finally, the Art of Doing Nothing cannot be mastered overnight. It will take hours and hours of practice, of hard work (doing nothing isn’t easy!). But you will enjoy every minute of it! Try it today.

Want more tips on staying focused in your life?  See “Minutes of Mindfulness” every Monday.

Relax Into the Moment (try this tip)

Relax Into the Moment

By Leo Babauta  A guest post

You might be surprised how often we’re resisting life.

If you assess your body right now, I bet you can find some kind of tension or tightness. For me, it’s often in my chest, but sometimes it’s in my jaw, face, neck or shoulders.

Where does this tightness come from? We’re struggling against something — perhaps we’re irritated by someone, frustrated by something, stressed or overwhelmed by all we have to do, or just don’t like whatever it is we’re faced with. This causes a resistance, a hardening or tightening. Everyone does it, most of the day.

It’s normal, but it causes unhappiness, an aversion to the present moment, struggles with other people or ourselves, struggles with the task we’re faced with. What I’ve found useful is the idea of relaxing into the moment.

Try this:

  • Notice where the tension is in your body right now.
  • Notice what you’re tightening against — it might be someone else, or whatever it is you’re faced with.
  • Relax the tightness. Just let yourself melt.
  • Face the same situation, but with a relaxed, friendly attitude.

And repeat as often as you can remember, throughout the day. Just use the phrase “relax into the moment” to remind yourself.

What this does is helps us to face the day with less tension and greater contentment. We struggle less with how other people are, and instead might open our hearts to them and see that they, like us, are struggling and want to be happy.

We might face a task with less resistance, and instead do it with a smile. We might just notice the physical space around us and start to appreciate it for the unique gift that it is. And in the end, we’re changing our mode of being from one of struggle and resistance to one of peace and gratitude.

release

5 Ways to Relax…

Ring.  Ring.  Buzz.  Beep.  Bloop.  What’s all that?  Oh it’s your devices going off.  Deadlines are coming up.  You are stressed out.  Stress leads to sickness.  So take a minute to re-charge without feeling guilty because in the long run, you will be much better off.

How do I relax?

1. Go to your happy place.   Where’s my happy place?  If you don’t know, chances are you need to relax.  For me, it’s the beach.  Since I live near there, I can go stick my feet in the sand and relax.  But it could easily be a hammock, a favorite restaurant, a movie, a good book, or just closing my eyes for a few minutes thinking about my children, husband and dachshunds.  Or perhaps a massage in Jamaica.  Whatever:)
2. Listen to music.  I have eclectic taste in music.  Okay, fine, I listen to old music mostly.  However, I have songs that bring about happy feelings, so they relax me.  I can just put on some Rusted Root and send me on my way to my happy place.  I can listen to Celtic inspired music and dream about the day I actually get to go to Ireland.  And Bob Marley and his birds, well, I need them to remind me about the joys of little things.
3. Breathe deeply and be present.  Unfortunately, this one is my nemesis.  I work on staying present, but it’s like this giant battle in my head.  “Oh look.  It’s the past.  Let’s go there.”  Or “Hey, let’s go down this path to worry.  You like it a lot.”  Noooo.  Not there.  Path to now.  Let’s stay on that path.  “Wait, a bunny.  It’s leading me to what if?”  WHAT IF??  No.  Absolutely don’t follow the bunny.  Bad bunny.  Trying to take me down the rabbit hole.
4. Unplug from devices.  Bzzz.  Beep.  Bling.  Message.  Text.  Call.  Notifications x 100.  Groups.  FB status.  E-mail.  Ahhhhhhhhhhhh.  Stop the insanity!  That’s why for family vacations, people might be extremely surprised to find out the social media gal, that’s me, goes away to state parks that don’t have internet or any connection to the outside world.  Muhaha.  And if you are that person who has tried to remove Facebook from your phone for the third time…but re-installs it.  Or deletes their profile…and gets back on.  Well, at least you tried.
5. Get moving!  Honestly, this is the best.  I do “the yoga” to relax.  It helps me get into my flow, which I have mentioned before, is my moving meditation.  It is the way I truly and fully live in the now.  I listen to the teacher and focus only on me.  I don’t care what you are doing in the class, I really am focused on me.  Sometimes, I might make a joke under my breath that others close by might hear as I talk myself through a pose…but I am truly only thinking about the present moment.  I am trying not to talk to myself as much about my short comings…but working alone, I spend lots of time in my head.   That’s why this one is the best for me!!

5 ways to relax

No peace. Know peace…

Ohmmmm.

Directing attention to my third eye, I could feel the tension build.  Wait, I am supposed to be looking beyond ordinary sight.  Let me clear my mind.  I can hear my instructor telling me to focus.  I breathe in and out and feel the warmth of the hot yoga studio envelop me.  The steam embraces me and I relax.  But I still can’t believe what my friend told me right before class.  No, push those thoughts away.  Focus on your breathing.  If I was her, I would…wait.  You are not her, and you need to focus.  Those thoughts can wait.  We both enjoyed our class and pushed everything away.  Drenched in sweat, the peace descended on me.  The tension released and somehow I felt a sense of clarity.

When my friends ask me for advice, I put myself in their position and answer as honestly as I can.  No matter what, my friends know that when they ask me something, they need to be ready to hear what I have to say.  I have learned over the years to hold back until I think they are ready to hear what I have to say.  Sometimes that does not always work, but if I answered in any way other than the truth, I would have no peace.  You see, I believe that in order to know peace, you must have that moment of no peace.  Get it?

When a deep question is asked, you must dig deep for the answer.  I believe that most of the time, you already know the answer, but it is uncomfortable to face.  As humans, we go through all the emotions that make us who we are.  Shock, denial, anger, bargaining with yourself (which often leads to guilt), depression, and my favorite acceptance and hope.  During this time, you have no peace.  Sleepless nights, anxiety, headaches, and tension occur until you finally come to your decision and know peace.  At that time, you will begin to feel a sense of relief and purpose knowing what you have to do.  When you begin to move forward, you will emerge a better person.  Your time is coming.  Trust me.

“The keys to patience are acceptance and faith. Accept things as they are, and look realistically at the world around you. Have faith in yourself and in the direction you have chosen.”  ~Ralph Marston

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Beltane…

The first day of May was traditionally known as an ancient Gaelic holiday.  The sun has progressed to its mid-way point between the spring equinox and the summer solstice.  For me, it marks the day that I do the final countdown in my head.  I know that if I make it through this month, school is almost over.  This is always an exciting time.  I am reminded of a certain piece of literature:

“The month of May was come, when every lusty heart beginneth to blossom, and to bring forth fruit; for like as herbs and trees bring forth fruit and flourish in May, in likewise every lusty heart that is in any manner a lover, springeth and flourisheth in lusty deeds. For it giveth unto all lovers courage, that lusty month of May.”  ~Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte d’Arthur

Oh yes, every “lusty heart” have beginneth to blossom for sure at my school.  We are lusting after pedicures, days in the sun, maxi-dresses, bikinis, sandy toes, cocktails, and actually reading a book for pleasure, not to the class.  Mommas are looking forward to play dates with their friends and kids, staying up later and looking for lightning bugs, going to the park and letting our kids just be kids.  As for me, I’m a no-schedule kind of gal in the summer.  Call me up on short notice and invite me somewhere.  Got an extra ticket to that thing you like?  Sweet.  I’ll go.  Yup.  It’s kind of like this in my head now:

For those of you who don’t know me, I had hair like Europe back in the day.  Don’t judge.  It rocked.

“How much of human life is lost in waiting?”  ~Ralph Waldo Emerson