Why Procrastination Might Actually Be Your Intuition Guiding You.

Why Procrastination Might Actually Be Your Intuition Guiding You.In essence, procrastination is the act of postponing or doing something.  It leaves us feeling like we have something hanging over our heads most of the time that we just didn’t get to.  We have a list of things we were going to do, but most often, move some of those items over to a new list at the end of the day, week, or perhaps month.  But what if…it is our intuitive guidance system and we are trying to override it by feeling like we have to get things done right now?

You are scrolling through the feed, and something catches your eye.  You feel like you have read it before or you were meant to read it right then, but then you wonder if it is meant to distract you from your true purpose, so you try to get back on track yet again with what you were doing.

Maybe looking up inspirational quotes will help you stay inspired, and one catches your eye.

If you spend too much time thinking about a thing, you’ll never get it done. ~ Bruce Lee

Is procrastination really your intuition guiding you like Bruce Lee seems to be using his chi as guidance?  Do you believe that a force of energy can actually guide you?  Have you ever had that feeling that maybe, just maybe, someone or something is watching out for you?  Then read more.

Signs that Procrastination is Actually Your Intuition Guiding You:

  1. Warning!  Do you get a sense that perhaps you shouldn’t start a project right away or give someone an answer they are waiting for?  Cue visions of the little old lady/witch handing Snow White the poisoned apple.  Maybe someone is really just trying to pass off their toxic items to you, hmm?
  2. The pause feels like it should be there.  In this day and age of shortening up tasks, speech and dial times << remember that?  Cue horrible screeching sound as you waited to connect.  The pause gave you a second to register what might be going on.  That pause gave you a moment to breathe, think, connect to your thoughts and oftentimes, it sent cues to your 5 senses.  But what about your 6th sense?  If you pick up on what is not said, but felt, subtle cues in energy shifts, and reasons for the pause, don’t ignore that.  The pause is connecting the dots for you.
  3. You get a sense that you really should say no.  I will never forget the week-long “pause” I gave my daughter when she kept asking me to go to a friend’s house and spend the night.  I didn’t have any reason whatsoever to say no, but it felt like I should.  I even said to her, I don’t know why, but it feels like I shouldn’t let you go.  Weirdly enough, we had a talk about something I saw in my feed that was bad that week.  Still, at the last moment, I caved.  Since I am not Cher and can’t turn back time, it still feels like slow motion as I got the call from the girl’s mother.  I was ALMOST FREAKING THERE.  My daughter had been in a bicycle accident.  Guess what we had talked about before going?  The thing in my feed that was bad.  It was a bicycle accident.  I floored it, turned into the neighborhood, and slammed on brakes and ran up to the house.  My daughter was covered in blood and I couldn’t tell where she was hurt.  Her shoes, the ones I never let her ride a bike with here at home, were broken as they were sandals.  I won’t describe her toes or her knee, but a demon took over as I said to the other mom was she at least wearing a helmet?  When I found out no, I went a little crazy and scooped her up and flew down the road to the emergency center.  Went a little crazy is probably an understatement to be honest, but there was so much blood that I blamed myself.  So, after hours of things I won’t share here, she was patched up, her foot is okay now, and to this day she has a massive pile of scar tissue on her knee to remind her, and me as well, don’t press mom when she says no.
  4. There are signs if you know where to look.  I have never doubted the signs I was given that week, and have never given in again if something I can’t explain tells me to say no, or go this way, or not take that road, or watch my step here, etc.  The signs might be things like a pause, a weird feeling overcoming you like premonition, a desire to move away from someone, weird dreams that seem to be warnings, a tingling or prickling in between your eyebrows or even the hairs on the back of your neck.  Your Facebook feed feels odd, like you are seeing all the bad stories around this one thing (should have listened to this one).  Yes, I know it is weird, spooky, etc. if this is new to you, but it’s better to be safe than as sorry as I was.  Trust me on this one.  I am very glad it wasn’t worse because the signs I was seeing were around a concussion on a bike that week, and we had literally had the talk about what proper bicycle wear was and my daughter assured me she knew better.

So if all of that doesn’t feel like why you are procrastinating, then go ahead and get things done.

Here are a few posts you might like if you really just put things off:

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Why Procrastination Might Actually Be Your Intuition Guiding You.

The Quickstart Guide to a Decluttered Home

A guest post by Leo Babauta

One of my favorite habits that I’ve created since I changed my life 9 years ago is having a decluttered home.

I now realize that I always disliked the clutter, but I put off thinking about it because it was unpleasant.

The thought of having to deal with all that clutter was overwhelming, and I had too much to do, or I was too tired, so I procrastinated.

Clutter, it turns out, is procrastination.

But I learned to deal with that procrastination one small chunk at a time, and I cleared it out. That was truly amazing.

Amazing because I didn’t really believe I could do it until I did it. I didn’t believe in myself. And amazing because when it was done, there was a background noise that was removed from my life, a distraction, an irritation.

Decluttering my home has meant a more peaceful, minimal life. It’s meant I spend less time cleaning, maintaining my stuff, looking for things. Less money buying things, storing things. Less emotional attachment to things.

For anyone looking to begin decluttering, I’d like to offer a short guide on getting started. Know that this guide isn’t comprehensive, and it can take months to really get down to a decluttered home … but if you do it right, the process is fun and liberating and empowering, each step of the way.

  1. Start small. Clutter can be overwhelming, and so we put it off. The best thing I did was to just focus on one small space to start with. A kitchen counter (just part of it) is a good example. Or a dining table, or a shelf. Clear everything off that space, and only put back what you really need. Put it back neatly. Get rid of the rest — give it away, sell it on Craigslist, donate it, recycle it. The clearing and sorting will take 10 minutes, while you can give stuff away later when you have the time.
  2. Work in chunks. If you start small, you’ll feel good about it, but there’s still a whole home full of stuff to deal with. How do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time. (Not literally — I’m vegan.) So just like you did one small area to start with, keep doing that, just 10 minutes a day, maybe more if you feel really enthusiastic. If you have a free day on the weekend, spend an afternoon doing a huge chunk. Spend the whole weekend if you feel like it. Or just do one small piece at a time — there’s no need to rush, but keep the progress going.
  3. Follow a simple method. For each small chunk you do, clear out the area in question and put everything in one pile. Pick up the first thing off the pile (no putting it aside to decide later) and force yourself to make a decision. Ask yourself: do I love and use this? If not, get rid of it. If the answer is yes, find a place for it — I call it a “home”. If you really love and use something, it deserves a home that you designate and where you put it back each time you’re done with it. Then go to the next thing and make the same decision. Working quickly and making quick decisions, you can sort through a pile in about 10 minutes (depending on the size of the pile).
  4. Put stuff in your trunk. Once you’ve collected stuff to donate or give away, put them in boxes or grocery bags and put them in the trunk of your car (if you don’t have a car, somewhere near the door). Choose a time to deliver them. Enjoy getting them out of your life.
  5. Talk to anyone involved. If you have a significant other, kids, or other people living with you, they’ll be affected if you start decluttering the home. You should talk to them now, before you get started, so they’ll understand why you want to do this, and get them involved in the decision-making process. Ask them what they think of this. Send them this article to consider. Ask if they can support you wanting to declutter, at least your own stuff or some of the kitchen or living room, to see what it’s like. Don’t be pushy, don’t try to force, but have the conversation. Be OK if they resist. Try to change the things that you can control (your personal possessions, for example) and see if that example doesn’t inspire them to consider further change.
  6. Notice your resistance. There will be a lot of items that you either don’t want to get rid of (even if you don’t really use them), or you don’t feel like tackling. This resistance is important to watch — it’s your mind wanting to run from discomfort or rationalize things. You can give in to the resistance, but at least pay attention to it. See it happening. The truth is, we put a lot of emotional attachment into objects. A photo of a loved one, a gift from a family member, a memento from a wedding or travel, a treasured item from a dead grandfather. These items don’t actually contain the memories or love that we think are in them, and practicing letting go of the items while holding onto the love is a good practice. And practicing tackling clutter that you dread tackling is also an amazing practice.
  7. Enjoy the process. The danger is to start seeing decluttering as yet another chore on your to-do list. Once you start doing that, it becomes something you’ll put off. Instead, reframe it to a liberating practice of mindfulness. Smile as you do it. Focus on your breathe, on your body, on the motions of moving items around, on your feelings about the objects. This is a beautiful practice, and I recommend it.

These steps won’t get your home decluttered in a weekend. But you can enjoy the first step, and then the second, and before you know it you’ve taken 30 steps and your home is transformed. You’ll love this change as much as I have.